The Drawing Freak

When I was young, drawing was all about the doodling and creativity and fun. Drawing was a bunch of scribbles and spirals.

Somehow along the way, drawing to me was limited to drawing houses, flowers, grass, clouds, and the sun. There were no people. It was all about a house that lived on its own, admiring how the invisible wind swayed the grass and how the flowers danced. The clouds, fluffy, white, and plentiful, protected the house from an intense glare of the bright and joyful sun.

But I was laughed at by several people or one specific girl, so my drawings changed, and the house disappeared and all the world around it.

I drew faces now. Odd faces. Some people had no eyebrows or no ears or neither. Some I gifted with strange straight-lined necks and the others not.

I enjoyed that – even got praise and admiration from my peers and teachers alike!

But one specific girl glared at me and scoffed, saying I was always absorbed in a notebook and drawing “those people” – quietly, of course, and to her friend. But she made sure I was close enough and that she was loud enough to make my heart break.

My best friend liked my drawings and defended me when she could.

But then one specific boy said my drawings were “good enough,” and that made my heart shatter in millions of pieces my best friend and I could not put back together.

And suddenly, my notebook was gone and so was my passion and love for drawing.

And so it was for at least three years until my best friend decided that it was finally time to bring up a subject she and I had not brought up for so long that I had forgotten it.

And so began the days I taught my friend to draw.

Years had passed since that day, but since then, I could only say the both of us have been getting better with different styles. For the first time in my life on that day, I began to focus on a person’s eyes, eyelids, ears, eyebrows, neck, cheeks, nose, hair, and so much more because now I was teaching someone. Then I had to think of arms, legs, shoes, hands, bodies. And then color. Shading. Costume. Height. Characterization since every person must be different. Emotions and styles. Hand gestures, even ankles and wrists. There were also lips and eye color, skin color too.

There were details to be finalized and perfected, and there always will be because as a good artist, “you are never satisfied with your work. There will always be something you can approve.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s